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Muladhara | Root Chakra

Muladhara | Root Chakra

Svadistanha | Sacral Chakra

Svadistanha | Sacral Chakra

Manipura | Solar Plexus Chakra

Manipura | Solar Plexus Chakra

Anahata | Heart Chakra

Anahata | Heart Chakra

Visshuda | Throat Chakra

Visshuda | Throat Chakra

Ajna | Brow Chakra | Third Eye

Ajna | Brow Chakra | Third Eye

Sahasrara | Crown Chakra

Sahasrara | Crown Chakra

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Methods for Awakening the Chakras One traditional approach to the awakening of the chakras is exemplified by the Gorakshashatakam, a brief treatise written in the tenth century by the guru Goraknath. This text will be presented in detail in Chapter VI-B. The principle technique described is the concentration on each chakra while gazing at the tip of the nose. For example, Goraknath 108 writes, “The first chakra, called adhara (the muladhara), is like burnished gold. Meditating on it with the gaze fixed on the tip of the nose, one is freed from sin. The second chakra is the svadhisthana, as beautiful as a genuine ruby. Meditating on it with the gaze fixed on the tip of the nose, one is freed from sin.” The effectiveness of this practice can be explained by the location of the ida and pingala nadis, which originate in the muladhara chakra – the seat of kundalini – and terminate in the left and right nostrils, respectively. Gazing at the tip of the nose therefore stimulates these nadis and the muladhara chakra, as well as the kundalini it houses. When using this method while concentrating on another chakra, the practitioner can cause kundalini to rise and further energize that chakra, already activated by mental concentration. This 109 technique of nose-gazing, then, is a powerful method which can potentially double the effects of concentration. However, since this practice is so simple and monotonous, a beginner finds himself easily distracted by thoughts and desires which emerge from the subconscious. His mind becomes restless, and his concentration is easily broken. For these reasons, the practices recommended here are of a more comprehensive and varied nature. Indian yoga has devised and handed down other effective methods for awakening the chakras which combine chakra concentration with asanas, pranayama, and mudras. The mechanism of these practices follows a distinct pattern: first, prana is absorbed through pranayama; next, the chakra is stimulated physically and phychically through specific asanas and mudras; and finally, the chakra is activated by the infusion of channeled prana and direct mental concentration.

Hiroshi Motoyama